Deadweather and Sunrise

I think that all of Mr. Heasley’s class should read Deadweather and Sunrise, by Geoff Rodkey, because it is a great book. With pirates, treasure also comes too, as do rich evil people. All of this happens in Deadweather and Sunrise.

Deadweather and Sunrise is about a boy named Egg (short for Egbert), who lives on Deadweather Island, a hot and muggy place full of pirates. It teaches you (loosely) about what life was about in the 17th and 18th century. It is very interesting to learn what people did for fun back then.

Now, you might say, “Why would I want to read this if I could just learn about the 17th and 18th century for real at the library?” I’ll tell you why. It doesn’t just tell you about fictional stuff. It also involves how to survive on a deserted island, what cruise ships were like, and how rich people lived back then. It also has fictional stuff, such as a treasure that is supposedly magical, and a dead king who could strike down enemies with an extremely powerful glove.

All of Mr. Heasley’s class should read Deadweather and Sunrise, because it loosley tells you about what life was like in the 17th and 18th century when pirates where the most successful, and fictional stuff like a power glove and a magic treasure. Check Deadweather and Sunrise out or buy it ASAP.


Stick Dog

        Stick Dog by Tom Watson is about a (you guessed it!) stick dog and its friends. They have “adventures” around their town, looking for food (in this case, hamburgers). As they run towards the scent of the food, they come up with ideas to get it (since it is almost always “guarded” by humans). I can’t tell you the ending, unless you like spoilers, and, in that case, email me and I’ll tell you.

        I would recommend this book to people who like Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Dork Diaries, or an easy and fast read. If you like your books full of action and violence, I wouldn’t read this book. Thanks for reading this, everybody. Hope you like the book!



I Even Funnier

I Even Funnier, by James Patterson and Chris Grabenstein, is about a middle-schooler named Jamie who is unable to use his legs due to a car accident. Instead of being depressed at his disability, he uses it to make jokes about things like the handicapped stall in the bathroom.

After winning the New York regionals in  a comedy contest, he moves on to the Boston quarterfinals, all while fending off his bully/cousin, Stevie Kosgrov. Unfortunately, after winning the quarterfinals, his uncle has a heart attack, so Jamie can’t go the Las Vegas semifinals. You’ll have to read the book to find out the rest.

I would recommend this book to anyone who likes middle school stories, comedy, and not-so-tragic tragedy.




Hitler’s Secret
Hitler’s Secret, by William Osborne, is about two German-speaking teenagers who, during WWII, are recruited by the British military. Their mission is to get a young nun in training out of her home (a convent) and across the Germany-Switzerland border to the Admiral MacPherson.
In doing this, they get the attention of the Nazis. The Nazis begin to follow them across Germany, specifically Reinhard Heydrich and his troops. Heydrich, being a Nazi, obviously will kill to get what he wants, which he does. I won’t get into detail.
I would recommend this book to anyone who likes war stories, action, violence, and blood. Oh, and be able to tolerate a little language. I would not recommend this book to anyone who likes humor, not-so-tragic tragedy, and non-violence.